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20121201
20121201
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
everywhere. i have been keeping my own money and nice list for washington. visiting towns like this. >> president obama got his wish rather than negotiating with republicans he was simmering them back on the campaign trail at a factory in pennsylvania that makes angry birds toys. >> it's not acceptable to me, and i don't think it's acceptable to you for and full of republicans in congress told middle-class tax cuts hostage simply because they don't want tax rates on upper income folks to go up. >> within minutes the speaker fired back that the talks are now on life support. >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> replan the president for sending treasury secretary to capitol hill with a proposal that led senate republican leader to literally burst out laughing. >> the white house took three weeks to respond with any kind of a proposal. much to my disappointment it was not a serious one. >> the president campaigns on $800 -- 800 billion in tax increases by ending the bush tax cuts for the wealthy, but is now proposing. adding tax hikes on dividends and capital gains. the
of the toughest policy issues dividing democrats and republicans. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: many companies aren't waiting on washington to reach an agreement on taxes and spending. they're taking action now to pay shareholders, by declaring special dividends. today, whole foods became the latest in a slew of firms opting for one-time payouts. suzanne pratt reports on what's behind these investor pay-days. >> reporter: costco is doing it. brown forman-- the maker of jack daniels and finlandia is also doing it. today, even whole foods is finding it appetizing. they've all announced special dividends, eager to reward their shareholders with a nice check before expected tax increases happen next year. >> current law says that qualified dividend income tax rates are at 15%. and, if no legislation is passed between now and then end of the year, those rates would go up to as high as 43.4%. >> companies just want to pass along these dividends. it's a thank you to shareholders. it sparks interest in their stock. >> reporter: according to s&p, this month alone 216 companies have declared
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)